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1892 Biographies


Historical and Biographical Album of the Chippewa Valley Wisconsin Edited by George Forrester A. Warner Publisher 1891-2

Index of Biographies

Adams,Henry  Ames, A.G.   Barrows, H.C.  Bates, A.M.  Bond, Samuel 
Brown, Mrs. Harvey C.  Brownlee, E.G.  Brownlee, J.T.  Cathcart, J.M.  Cheny, J.E.  Corbett, Daniel C. 
Day, A.  Dillon, F.H.  Dillon, T. Jr.  Dutter, Reuben  Farrington, L.D.  Farrington, P.V.  Ford, Charles 
Gates, Hubbard  Giles, H.C.  Gilkey, G.W.  Hardy, C.S.  Hayes, W.R.  Hebard, C.  Hilliard, O.W. 
Holmes, C.  Houser, W.L.  Hubbard, G.  Hurtley, Thomas  Jackson, E.  Johnson, J.H.  Kellom, G.W. 
Knapp, W.M.  Lockwood,B.S.  Merritt, Loren A.  Miller, C.S.  Miller, Simon  Nelson, C.R.  Nicholson, C.  Nogle, H.M.  Nogle, L.D.  Pabst, J.  Pace, Charles W.  Pace, J.D.  Peeso, N.A.  Pierce, John  Standish, W.L.  Sessions, Albert  Stanley, S.N.  Van Pelt, David  Wells, G.  Whelan, J.W.  Wyman, W.W. 


Adams, Henry
Henry Adams, farmer, P.O., Mondovi, was born in Susquehanna county, Pa., July 27, 1833, and is a son of David and Deborah Adams. David was a farmer by occupation, and died at the age of fifty-three years; his parents were American born, and his father died when eighty years old. Mrs. Deborah Adams was also of American birth, and died at sixty-five years of age. Henry Adams remained with his parents on the farm until twenty years of age. In 1856 he came to Wisconsin and located on a farm about four miles from Mondovi, Buffalo county, where he bought eighty acres and began to improve the same, and has since added 400 acres, and now has 350 under cultivation. He has two good residences on his farm with large out-buildings for his stock and grain, and all the farm machinery that is necessary, as well as a cheese factory. He was the first man to build a frame house in the town of Naples., now Mondovi, Buffalo county. Mr. Adams married Miss Achsah Hilliard, who was born March 19, 1827, in Plattsburg, N.Y., on Lake Champlaign, , a daughter of Marinus and Betsy (Balch) Hilliard. Marinus Hilliard was born in 1789, and died at age sixty-eight years, his father, a native of England, was a sailor, and came to America in colonial times, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and later a pensioner. Mrs. Betsy Hilliard was born in Vermont in 1798 and died at sixty-eight years of age. She was of English descent; her father, Ebeneezer Balch, died in 1848, at the age of eighty years. Five children have been born to Mr. Adams and wife as follows: Clarence Hilliard and Florence Harriet, twins, born January 27, 1862; Obed Orlando, June 15, 1863; Ada Elizabeth, October 29, 1864, and Fanny Brand, February 7, 1871. Mr. Adams is a republican, and has been chairman of Mondovi township three terms, supervisor five terms, and school treasurer for thirteen different terms. He is not a member of any religious denomination, but gives generously to the Methodist Episcopal church.                        back to top
Ames, A.G.
Ames, Alonzo G., farmer, P.O. Mondovi, Alonzo G. Ames was born in Franklin county, Me., July 9, 1836, a son of Eben and Ellen (Waymouth) Ames. Eben Ames was a ship builder by trade, and served with his father in the war of 1812. They were both at the siege of Lake Champlain, and his father lost his life there. Eben was born in 1793 and died in 1865. Alonzo Ames, his father, was a captain of an English war ship, which position he resigned and came to America, settling near Boston. Alonzo G. moved to Wisconsin in 1846 and located in Linden township, Sheboygan county, and bought government land, on which he lived until 1858. He then acted as overseer on a plantation in Missouri for two years, then rented a farm on which he remained until the breaking out of the war, when the locality became too warm for him. He had either to join the Confederate army, or leave the country, so he chose to do the latter. He returned to Sheboygan county, Wis., August 1, 1861, and enlisted in the First Wisconsin infantry volunteers, Company I, and was mustered into the United States service at Camp Scott, Milwaukee. They were ordered to Louisville, Ky., and there built a fort on the Ohio river, then went into winter quarters. In the spring of 1862 they marched to Bowling Green, Ky., thence to Nashville, Tenn. They followed the enemy to Pulaski, Rogersville, on to Chattanooga and Huntsville, then back to Louisville, where our subject was detailed as a teamster. During this campaign they were almost continually under fire, and Mr. Ames, after being wounded was placed in hospital No. 7, and remained there for one year, when he was discharged on account of disability.    back to top
Barrows, H.C.
Barrows, H.C., Musical Dealer, Mondovi, 1860 H.C. Barrows was born in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., September 19, 1846, a son of Hiram and Naomi L. (Wing) Barrows. His father was born July 12, 1807, in Saratoga county, N.Y., and was a master mechanic by trade and kept a hotel for many years; he died September 23, 1866, at Mondovi, Wis. His grandfather, Calvin, was born in New York state about 1790. Mrs. Naomi L. Barrows was born in St. Lawrence county, N.Y., in 1813 and is now living at Mondovi, Wis. She has a long line of ancestors in this country. Hiram C. remained at home with his parents until the age of fourteen years. In 1860 the family moved to Mondovi, Buffalo county, and subsequently our subject accepted a position as clerk for N.K. West, of Augusta, Wis., with whom he remained until he enlisted in the army, March 22, 1865. He served as a musician in Company D, Fifty-third Wisconsin volunteer infantry. His regiment went south to Missouri, landed in St. Louis and camped at Pilot Knob, near Iron Mountain. He was disabled May 28, 1865, and was discharged the next day. After a year’s rest, he served as clerk until 1872, when he speculated in livestock until 1881. He then went into the mercantile business with his brother-in-law (Irwin Rowe), after running one year, bought out his brother and continued until 1888, when he went to Spokane Falls, Wash. He returned the following year, and is now engaged in the meat business at Mondovi. On October 20, 1866, he married Miss Mattie Stokes Rowe, born November 18, 1847, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Smiley) Rowe. William Rowe was of German descent, born in Pennsylvania, and is now living at the age of seventy years; his wife is a native of the same state of English descent Mrs. Barrows is a native of Straudsburg, Monroe county, Pa., and is the mother of three children, namely: Arthur F., born October 20, 1867; Wilbur Eaton, born July 12, 1871, and Etha Genevieve, born July 12, 1873. Mr. Barrows is a republican, and he and his wife belong to the Congregational church. Mrs. Barrows has been in the millinery business since 1876 and has been very successful. They celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of their marriage, October 18, 1891, receiving many valuable presents, with a host of friends and a representation of four generations present. It was a time that will long be remembered by all who participated in the occasion. In the fall of 1891 Mr. Barrows sold out his meat business and went into the confectionary business, and is still engaged in the same in Mondovi. He is among the early settlers, having lived in the same town for nearly thirty-two years.    back to top
Bates, A.M.
Bates, Amos Mordecai, cheese-maker, Mondovi, Amos Mordecai Bates was born in Canada, April 26, 1836, a son of George and Maria (Hill) Bates. His father, who was a mason by trade, was born April 11, 1803, in Yorkshire, England, and immigrated to Canada in 1835. He came to the United States in 1842 and lived in St. Lawrence county, N.Y., until 1850, when he moved to Sheboygan county, Wis. He died in Fond Du Lac County in 1890, at the age of eighty-seven years. Mrs. Maria Bates, the mother of our subject, was born April 25, 1803, in Yorkshire, England, where she had a line of noble ancestry; she died October 19, 1874. When Amos M. was seventeen years of age he and his brother bought their time of their father and commenced contracting to clear the forest of wood by the acre. Amos continued this work until twenty-five years old, and chopped the hardwood timber off of 125 acres of land himself. He bought a farm at the age of twenty years, and remained on it for ten years, then moved to Spring Creek, Tama county, Iowa, where he purchased a farm and tilled it for six years. He then returned to Sheboygan county, Wis., and rented a farm for two years, then bought and remained for eight years until he came to Mondovi, Buffalo county, and purchased a farm. July 13, 1882, at three o’clock in the morning, a terrible storm came up and blew his house off its foundation, turning it upside down, and literally smashing it to pieces. He with his wife and two children were in the house, and, though severely injured, miraculously escaped death. He then bought a residence in the city of Mondovi, and soon after purchased the cheese factory, which he has successfully conducted up to the present time. November 12, 1858, Mr. Bates married Miss Ada L. Robinson, who was born February 11, 1842, in Putnam county, N.Y., and is a daughter of Noah and Huldah (Kelly) Robinson. Noah Robinson was born in 1800 and died in 1877. His father was well to do, and the residence he occupied while living has been occupied by his direct descendants up to the present time, now the third generation. Mrs. Huldah Robinson was born in Putnam county, N.Y., and died at the age of fifty-nine years. Four children have been born to Mr. and his wife, namely: Delena Loretta, November 18, 1859; Harvey Chester, January 22, 1869; Elisha J., November 7, 1873, and died December 29, 1886; and La Vergne, born January 21, 1882. Politically, Mr. Bates is a republican; was elected town treasurer one term, supervisor two terms, school director two terms and school clerk two terms. He is a member of the Baptist church.    back to top
Bond, Samuel
Bond, Samuel, , farmer, P.O. Mondovi Samuel Bond was born in Monroe county, Pa., December 22, 1849, a son of Samuel and Catherine Bond. Lewis Bond, his grandfather, was born in Wales, and immigrated to America at an early day, and located in Pennsylvania, where he died. His son, Samuel, was born in Monroe county, Pa., December 20, 1803, and died December 20, 1862; he was a blacksmith by trade. His wife Catherine Bond, the mother of our subject, was born in Monroe county, Pa., and is still living. Our subject came west with his mother in October, 1864, and located in the town of Naples, Buffalo county, Wis., on a rented farm. At the age of fifteen years he commenced to work for H.P. Farrington, with whom he remained almost continuously for eighteen years. In the fall of 1888 he removed to the farm on which he now resides. December 12, 1888, Mr. Bond married Miss May Brown, a daughter of Harvey and Carolina Brown, and two children have blessed this union, namely: Mildred J., born September 30, 1889, and Max Forrest, born January 17, 1891. On political questions, Mr. Bond casts his suffrage with the prohibition party.    back to top
Brown, Mrs. Harvey C.
Brown, Mrs. Harvey C., was born in Crawford county, Pa., December 23, 1841, and is a daughter of Andrew and Mary (Cunningham) McEldowney. Her father was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, and immigrated to this country at the age of seventeen years, and engaged in farming until his death which occurred January 6, 1879; her mother was born in Crawford county, Pa., in 1803 and died September 10, 1868. Our subject was married to Harvey C. Brown March 21, 1860. He was born February 5, 1831, in Cattaraugus county, N.Y., and was a son of Walter and Diadama (Farrington) Brown. Walter Brown was born in 1800 and died June 19, 1868. His father, Phineas Brown, was born in Rhode Island in 1770, and was a son of John Brown of Providence. Harvey C. Brown received a fair common-school education, and when about eleven years old came west with his parents, who made the journey overland in twenty-one days, and arrived at Elkhorn, Wis., October 21, 1842. Later he came to La Crosse county, and in 1855 moved to Mondovi township and purchased 160 acres of government land, on which the family now resides. He subsequently purchased more land, and now the home farm consists of 240 acres, and is under a high state of cultivation. He built a good farm residence and many outbuildings, in which to store the products of the farm. February 29, 1864, he enlisted in the Thirty-sixth regiment, Wisconsin volunteer infantry, and was mustered into the United States service at Madison. He joined Grant’s army on the Potomac at Belle Plain, and notwithstanding he was sick most of the time while in the service, he was in the battle of the Wilderness, and around Petersburg, where he was in almost continuous fight for seven days. He never recovered his health, and June 10, 1886, he died, respected by all and mourned by his family and a large circle of friends. He always voted the republican ticket and took a great interest in town matters. He was elected chairman of his town, which position he filled for sixteen years, and served as assessor and school director for twelve years. Since the death of her husband Mrs. Brown has kept the family together in the old home, being ably assisted in the business of the farm by her son, William. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Brown, as follows: May Belle, January 18, 1861; Walter Andrew, July 10, 1862; Harvey Phillip, July 3, 1864; John Orlando, October 7, 1866; William, May 4, 1868; Diadama, January 10, 1870; John, March 16, 1873; Jenny Bertha, September 20, 1875; Grove Orlando, January 10, 1879. John Orlando died April 26, 1867, and Harvey Philip, February 6, 1885. Diadama is the wife of Eugene Hubbard, of Mondovi. May Belle married Samuel Bond, and resides in Naples township.    back to top
Brownlee, J.T.
Brownlee, James Thomas, farmer, P.O. Mondovi James Thomas Brownlee was born at Montreal, Canada, October 10, 1841, a son of James and Margaret (McMullen) Brownlee. James Brownlee was born in Ireland in 1800, immigrated to America in 1841, and settled in Burlington, Vt. In 1858, he went to Rutland county, and in 1878 to Mondovi, and died there in 1882. His wife was of Irish descent, and died soon after the birth of our subject. James T. Brownlee remained in Benson, Vt., until 1861. He finished his education by spending one year at the Brandon seminary. He learned the miller’s trade at Fair Haven, Vt. October 4, 1861; he enlisted in Company F, Sixth Vermont volunteer infantry. His regiment went south and joined the Sixth corps of the army of the Potomac, at Camp Griffin, near Washington, D.C. Early in the spring of 1862 his regiment marched on the battlefield of Manassas, thence to Alexandria, and from there to Newport News, Va., Fortress Monroe and Yorktown. The five Vermont regiments, including the Sixth, were then combined and known as the Vermont brigade throughout the war. He was with his regiment at Williamsburg, Malvern Hill, Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. Mr. Brownlee was wounded at the last-named battle and was in the hospital for about six months, then rejoined his regiment in December, 1863, and was at the battle of the Wilderness, in which the Vermont brigade lost in killed and wounded 1,200 of their 2,800 men. Mr. Brownlee was slightly wounded, but was enabled to take part in the fights at Cold Harbor, Spottsylvania Court House and Petersburg. He was also in the series of fights in the Shenandoah valley under Sheridan, and was again slightly wounded. October 29, 1864, he was discharged with his regiment, there being only thirty-three of his comrades left who had enlisted with him. After returning home Mr. Brownlee accepted a position as clerk in the office of the assistant provost-marshal at Brattleboro, Vt., and remained there two years. In 1866 he moved to Terre Haute, Ind., and worked there at his trade until December 25, 1868, when he came to Mondovi, Buffalo county, Wis., and worked in a mill for the subsequent three years. In 1873 he bought his present farm, which consists of 404 acres, 250 of which are under improvement. In 1874 he bought the flour mill at Mondovi. It washed out in 1878, but he rebuilt it the following year, and still owns and operates it. Mr. Brownlee married, October 18, 1866, Miss Fannie Elizabeth, daughter of Gardner and Mary A. Fleming, of Hinsdale, N.H. She was born May 10, 1846, in Hinsdale. Four children have been born to this union: Bessie, April 12, 1868; Edward Gardner, March 16, 1869; Mary Elizabeth, December 12, 1871, and Joseph Thomas, April 28, 1874. Politically, Mr. Brownlee is a republican, and has been chairman, town treasurer and school officer for many years.    back to top
Cathcart, J.M.
Cathcart, James M., farmer, P.O. Mondovi, was born December 7, 1837, in Washington county, N.Y., a son of Luther J. and Polly (Nelson) Cathcart. His father was born in Connecticut in 1795, and died at the age of eighty-three years; his mother was born about 1798, of American parentage, ad died at the age of sixty-three years. Silas Cathcart, grandfather of our subject, was of an old American family, and lived to be very aged; his wife, Mary, died at the advanced aged of ninety years. James M. lived with his parents until 1856, when he came west and worked on a farm near Fox Lake, Dodge county, Wis., for one year. He then came to Mondovi, and in 1860, bought eighty acres of land, which he still owns, and has it under a fine state of cultivation. September 23, 1864, he enlisted in Company K, Twenty-fifth Wisconsin volunteer infantry, and joined his regiment at Marietta, Ga. He was in front of Atlanta, with Sherman on his march to the sea, and participated in all the battles that were fought on this famous ridge, and took part in the final review at Washington. He was united in marriage, May 27, 1862, with Miss Mary Minerva Warren, who was born May 27, 1841, in Naples, Ontario county, N.Y., a daughter of Elijah and Eliza Ann (Fuller) Warren. Elijah Warren was born August 6, 1810, in Oneida county, N.Y. His father, Nehemiah Warren, was a native of Massachusetts, and died at eighty-three years of age, and his mother was eighty-nine years old at her decease. Elijah Warren died May 8, 1891, at the age of eighty-one years; Eliza Ann died September 4, 1860. Her father, Dr. Otis Fuller, was born in Berkshire county, Mass., in 1790; his wife, Minerva, was born the same year, and was also of American birth. Mr. Cathcart is a republican, and has served as an assessor for the last twenty years. He is not a member of any religious denomination, but is a believer in the principles upheld by Christians. Mr. and Mrs. Cathcart have had the following children: Anolia, June 3, 1863, died July 22, 1867; Cora Eliza, January 19, 1872, and Frank Luther, August 28, 1876.    back to top
Corbett, Daniel C.
Corbett, Daniel C., farmer, P.O. Mondovi, Buffalo county Daniel C. Corbett was born in Mentzt, Cayuga county, N.Y., September 4. 1835. a son of Carlton and Lydia Clark (Zeahuff) Corbett. Carlton Corbett was born in Bennington, Vt., June 19, 1803, and died in 1875; he was a farmer by occupation. His father, Daniel, was born near Boston, Mass., and died at the age of ninety-one years; his wife, Catherine (Everett) Corbett, also lived to be ninety years old. Mrs. Lydia Corbett, the mother of our subject, was born March 4, 1810, and is still living. Her father, Daniel Zeahuff, was a shoemaker by trade, and her mother, Susan, lived to be seventy-eight years old. Daniel C. came west with his father in 1849, and located in Waukesha county, Wis., where he lived until he moved to his present home. In 1869 he came to Drammen township, Eau Claire county, and purchased eighty acres of land, on which he now resides, and has at present fifty-five acres under improvement. May 13, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Fifth Wisconsin regiment, and was mustered into the United States service at Madison, and sent thence to Fort Advance, where he remained until 1862. The first engagement in which his regiment took part was at Lee’s Mills. He was taken sick afterward and did not return to his regiment until the fall of 1862, when he took part in the following battles: Rappahannock Station, Rapidan, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. His regiment was then detached to go to New York city to enforce the draft, which they did throughout the state. At Goshen orders were received to go back to the army of the Potomac, and the regiment went into winter quarters near Rappahannock Station. In the spring of 1864 it went with Grant to the Wilderness, where Mr. Corbett was wounded and sent to the hospital. After getting better he was assigned to duty as a nurse and continued in this position until July 11, when he was sent back to his regiment at Washington. He was discharged at Madison, July 30, 1864. April 2, 1865, Mr. Corbett married Julia Mary, born in 1843, a daughter of Chauncey and Adeline Brumell. This union has been blessed with two children: Nellie M., born January 12, 1866, and Carrie M., born October 15, 1868. Mrs. Corbett died November 2, 1868. January 3, 1871, Mr. Corbett married Sarah Everett Hessler, who was born August 4, 1830, in Monroe county, Pa., a daughter of John and Katie Everett. He is a republican in politics and has held the office of supervisor for two terms.    back to top
Day, A.
Day, Alfred, farmer, P.O. Mondovi, Buffalo county Alfred Day was born at Sheffield, Loraine county, Ohio, July 28, 1838, a son of John and Cornelia A (Sackett) Day. His grandfather, John Day Sr., was a sea captain. One of his ancestors, Robert Day, a native of Wales, came to Massachusetts at a very early day, probably in the Mayflower. John Day Jr. was born at Sheffield, Berkshire county, Mass., March 23, 1801. March 24, 1831, he married a daughter of Noadiah Sackett, who was born in Vermont. Their children were: Alfred, John I., Hubert, and Lillie (Mrs. Barnes). John Day Jr. died at Sheffield, Ohio, March 22, 1871, and Mrs. Day died March 11, 1881. Our subject grew up on his father’s farm and attended the district school in the winters. He enlisted May 27, 1861, in Company K, Twenty-third Ohio volunteers, and took part in the battles of Antietem, South Mountain, Second Bull Run and Cloyd’s Mountain, and also did considerable skirmish duty. He was discharged July 5, 1864. The following year he made a trip through the west, including the Chippewa Valley. In 1866 he removed to Eau Claire and was employed for the next few years looking up and locating pine lands. In 1869 he purchased his present farm in Albany township. He married October 10, 1869, Lida A., daughter of William and Adaline (Stevens) Holmes. Mrs. Day was born at Pierpont, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Day have six children. Addie C., John W., Hubert, Alice J., Lida Augusta and Lilly Pearl. Mr. Day now owns 280 acres of well improved land. He has begun breeding Jersey cattle. Politically, he is republican and has served the town as assessor, chairman, justice of the peace, etc. For twelve years he was postmaster at East Pepin. He is a member of the G.A.R., and a highly esteemed citizen, and has held prominent offices in the Methodist Episcopal church at this place.    back to top
Dillon, F.H.
Dillon, Frank Henry, (deceased) was born at Kingston, Luzerne county, Pa., June 29, 1857, a son of Thomas and Lucy Amelia (Hulburt) Dillon. Thomas Dillon was born March 3, 1819, in Ireland, and was a son of Frank and Catherine (White) Dillon, the former born in Ireland, a tailor by trade, who immigrated to America in 1819, and located in Binghamton and attended school until his father died, when he was obliged to go to work and help support the family, as his mother was left with six small children, of whom he was the eldest. When he was twenty-one years of age he engaged in the nursery business in Troy, N.Y., and also at Williamsport, Pa., and remained in that business for sixteen years, and accumulated some property. In 1858 he came west and located in what was then Naples township, Buffalo county, and homesteaded and bought 720 acres of wild land, on which he has remained up to the present time, improving the land until he now has 600 acres under cultivation. He has a good residence, barns and other buildings suitable for a farm of this size, and also has it well stocked. Mr. Dillon was married, at the age of twenty-six, to Lavinia Hulbert, a daughter of Henry and Lucy (Hart) Hulburt. His wife died at the age of thirty-three years, and he afterward married her sister. Four children were born to them, namely: Frank Henry, whose name heads this sketch; James Newton, Thomas, and Lucy. He was a republican and held the office of supervisor two terms, was a director on the school board and school treasurer for a number of years. He was baptized in the Roman Catholic church when young, but when he became of age he renounced that faith and joined the Presbyterian church, of which he remained a member until he came west, when he joined the Congregational church, of which he is still a member. Frank Henry, his eldest son, attended the high school of Mondovi, and afterward Ripon college. After leaving that institution he entered the store of William Fisher as a clerk, and was with him two years, then entered into partnership with CJ. Spencer in the grocery business at Mondovi. He sold out to his partner after a year’s time, and started a general store under his own name, and continued alone until the fall of 1886, when John D.Pace bought a half interest, and the firm of Dillon and Pace has continued business until the present time. In 1886 Mr. Dillon entered the wholesale grocery business at Chippewa Falls, which he continued two years, then returned to Mondovi, and in 1889 started a private bank, which he carried until January 12, 1891, when it was incorporated under the state laws as the Bank of Mondovi, with a capital stock of $25,000. The corporators were: J.W. Whelan, Jacob Canar, R. Southworth, O.G. Hawkins, John D. Pace and Frank H. Dillon and the officers were elected as follows: J.W. Whelan, pres.; R. Southworth, vice-pres.; F.H. Dillon, cashier; John D. Pace, asst. cashier. January 24, 1878, Mr. Dillon married Miss Sarah Louise Smith, who was born in Green Lake county, Wis., January 18, 1855, a daughter of Edward Barnett and Cordelia (Sea) Smith. Edward B. Smith was born in New York in December, 1831, and was in the banking business in Madison, but died in Brooklyn, N.Y., at the age of thirty-four years. His father was also a banker and was president of the Brooklyn savings bank for twenty years before his death, which occurred at the age of seventy-three years. Mrs. Dillon’s mother, who is still living, was born September 20, 1836; her father was a prominent man in Tiffin, Ohio, and was a brigadier general in the Mexican war. Five children have been born to Mr. Dillon and wife, as follows: Ralph Neal, July 5, 1880; Earl Thomas, November18, 1881; Lelia Lucy, February 16, 1883; Frank Henry, May 20, 1885; and Grace Louise, October 24, 1887. Mr. Dillon was a republican in politics, and a member of the Congregational church. His demise occurred January 1, 1892, and was regretted by the entire community.    back to top
Dillon, T. Jr.
Dillon, Thomas, Furniture & Undertaking, Mondovi, 1869 Thomas Dillon Jr., Mondovi, was born in Mondovi, January 15, 1869. His early life was spent on the old homestead. He attended the district school until his eighteenth year, when he entered the graded school at Mondovi. A short time afterward he began to farm with his father, but not being in very good health, he took a trip to Dakota, where he remained about a year, then returned to Mondovi and began to learn the tinsmith’s trade with R. Southworth. After finishing his trade he accepted a position as head clerk in the general store of Dillon and Pace, and has held this position ever since. Although not a member of any church, he is a believer in the principles of religion. On political questions he is a republican.    back to top
Dutter, Reuben
Dutter, Reuben Farmer, P.O. Mondovi, Buffalo county Reuben Dutter was born in Pope, Carbon county, Pa., January 27, 1842, a son of Philip and Laura (Stroll) Dutter. Philip Dutter was born in Pennsylvania, was a cooper by trade, and died at the age of seventy-five years. Our subject left home at the age of eight years, and helped make shaved shingles for three years, then worked at odd jobs until he was fifteen years old. He then hired out as a teamster for ten years. In 1864 he came west and located in Naples township, Buffalo county, Wis., where he purchased eighty acres of wild land, of which he has seventy acres improved. He has worked at carpentering and also learned the watch-maker’s trade, and was in the jewelry business at Mondovi for three years, but moved back to his farm, on which he now resides. In June, 1864, Mr. Dutter married Miss Sarah Margaret Sax, who was born in Monroe county, Pa., May 30, 1846, and is the daughter of Perry and Katherine Sax. Perry Sax was born in Pennsylvania, November 23, 1816, of German descent, and is a lumberman by trade; his wife was born in Pennsylvania, February 24, 1819. Mr. Dutter and his wife are the parents of two children: Jennie Lucinda, born May 1, 1865, and John Wesley, born April 14, 1866. Mr. Dutter has always been a republican, and served as school clerk for nine years. He believes in the principles of the Methodist church, but is not a member; his wife has been a member for thirty-three years.    back to top
Farrington, L.D.
Farrington, Lorenzo Dow, Retired, Mondovi, 1855 Lorenzo Dow Farrington, farmer, P.O. Mondovi, was born December 11, 1822, a son of Abel and Clarissa (Baker) Farrington, the former of English descent, and the latter of Irish and German descent. His paternal grandfather came to America in early colonial times. His maternal grandfather was a native of Germany and immigrated to Cohocton, Steuben county, N.Y., at an early day. Lorenzo D. was born in Steuben county, N.Y. on a farm, and when quite young was taken by his parents to Naples township, Ontario county, same state. In 1844 he came with his parents to Wisconsin and located near Elkhorn, where he lived two years, then went ot Fox Lake, where he resided until the summer of 1855. He then located in what was then Naples township, now Mondovi, Buffalo county, which then abounded in elk, deer, bear and all kinds of game. He was very fond of hunting, and, with his brothers, supplied the neighborhood with all the wild meats they wanted. He has many a good story to tell of his experiences as a hunter in the early days of this county. Mr. Farrington married, in 1860, Miss Elsina Swift, and two children were born to them: Jessie, July 28, 1863, and George, April 29, 1865. Mrs. Farrington died in November, 1879, and August 6, 1882, he married again, his second wife being Miss Fanny Parker. Two children have been born to this latter marriage: Grover, born December 25, 1885, and Arthur, born April 27, 1891. Mr. Farrington has been a democrat for forty years, and though living in a strong republican township, has been elected assessor for eight terms, and township treasurer for seven terms.    back to top
Farrington, P.V.
Farrington,Putnam, V., , farmer, P.O. Mondovi, was born June 6, 1812, in Cohocton, Steuben county, N.Y., a son of Abel and Clarissa (Baker) Farrington, farmers in the state of Maine, of English descent. His grandfather immigrated to America in the early colonial times. His mother’s father was of German descent, and her mother was Irish, both having come to this country at an early day and settled in Cohocton, Steuben county, N.Y., on a farm. Putnam V. remained at home until the age of twenty years, attending school winters and working on the farm in summers. In 1840 he came west and located at Elkhorn, Walworth county, Wis., where he remained a short time, then removed to Fox Lake, Dodge county, and bought unimproved land and opened up a farm, but subsequently disposed of it. In 1855 he came to the then town of Naples, now Mondovi, Buffalo county, and with his brothers entered the first land and built a house of tamarack poles and sod. There were spent some of the happiest days of his life, hunting and fishing, as the country abounded in wild game, and the streams were filled with trout. He hunted during the winter and supplied his neighbors with wild meat, having killed, among other wild game, over 600 deer. Mr. Farrington was untied in marriage, June 5, 1861, with Miss Augusta Louisa, who was born October 20, 1833, a daughter of John and Ruth Fairbanks (Leonard) Lovejoy. John Lovejoy was born in 1802 in New Hampshire, on a farm, and died September 1, 1885. His father was born in America and died at 100 years of age. Mrs. Lovejoy was born in 1806, in New Hampshire; her prior to the revolutionary times, and some of them took part in the war of 1812. Mr. and Mrs. Farrington have an adopted daughter, Anna, born March 12, 1870. Her father, John Payzant, was of French descent, and came to this country from Nova Scotia in 1870, and still lives in Buffalo county. Her mother died soon after Anna’s birth. Mr. Farrington has been identified with the republican party since 1856, and is a member of the Methodist church, with which he has been identified for sixty years.    
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Ford, Charles
Ford, Charles, farmer, P.O. Mondovi, was born February 9, 1829, and is a son of Charles and Sophronia (Sparks) Ford. Charles B. was born in Lenox, Mass., August 28, 1791, and died September 5, 1877; he was by trade a shoemaker, but did farming most of his life. His father was also born in Massachusetts, and his ancestry as far as known were Americans. Mrs. Sophronia Ford was born in Lenox, Mass., April 12, 1803, and died March 20, 1869. She was the mother of twelve children, namely: Mary, born December 26, 1823; Charles and Jane, twins, December 27, 1824 (Charles died young, and Jane, March 5, 1845); Caroline, June 6, 1827, Charles, our subject; Almira, October 28, 1830; died November 30, 1853; John, February 22, 1833; George, December 27, 1834, died March 2, 1836; George, July 20, 1837; Marcus, November 22, 1839, died June 26, 1865; Jeanette, July 23, 1841; Margaret, April 25, 1845. At the age of twenty years our subject purchased the remainder of his time from his father, and went to Steuben county, N.Y., where he made the first start of his successful life in the lumber woods. In 1851 he came to Fon Du Lac county, Wis., and for two years rented farms, then purchased one, but in 1856 went to Dunn county, and purchased government land, and began to open up a farm. Not liking it there, he traded his claim for land near Mondovi, Buffalo county, on which he resided until 1868, when he moved onto the farm where he now resides, which consists of 160 acres, nearly all of which is under a high state of cultivation. February 5, 1852, Mr. Ford married Miss Elizabeth Plemmon, who was born May 28, 1832, in Jefferson county, N.Y., a daughter of Oliver and Amelia Plemmon. Her father was born in France and died at the age of thirty-six years; her mother was born in Canada, October 1, 1812, and died February 11, 1891. To Mr. and Mrs. Ford have been born eleven children, namely: Helen, December 25, 1853, died April 15, 1871; Isadore A., June 28, 1855, died January 30, 1856; Orlando B., April 15, 1859, died September 9, 1868; Charles H., April 161861; Oliver E., January 2, 1863; Oscar, March 26, 1865, died June 12, 1865; Edgar B., August 8, 1867; George P., March 23, 1869, died February 23, 1871; Ernest L., March 23, 1871; Arvilla, December 18, 1874, and John C., December 25, 1877. Mr. Ford is a republican in politics, and has been school director three terms, supervisor of his town for four terms, and alderman of the city of Mondovi two terms. His wife has been a Methodist for twenty years.    back to top
Gates, Hubbard
Gates, Hubbard a prominent farmer of the town of Mondovi, was born in Kirky, Vt., July 22, 1837, and was a son of Hubbard and Henrietta (Nickerson) Gates, the former of whom was born in 1803 and died in 1876, and was by occupation a farmer. His father, John Gates, the grandfather of our subject, died in 1854. The family came to the United States from England in the early colonial days. Henrietta, the mother of our subject, was born in Cape May, Mass., in 1806, and died in 1880. Her father, Joseph, was also born in Massachusetts, and was of English descent and died at the advanced age of seventy-three years. Hubbard Gates spent his early life on the home farm, going to school. He immigrated to Wisconsin in 1856, and engaged in farming until his enlistment, which occurred October 3, 1861, in Company B, First battalion, Thirteenth United States Infantry, and was attached to the fifteenth army corps. He was ordered to Jefferson Barracks, Mo., where he remained until February, 1862, when he was ordered to Alton, Ill. to guard prisoners of war until August 1, 1862, when he was sent to Louisville, Ky., then to Memphis, Tenn., to join Grant, and then to Vicksburg, and was in the first attack on Vicksburg, two days’ battle. He assisted in the capture of Arkansas Post January 11, 1863, after which he returned to Vicksburg, and worked on the canal projected by Grant to cut off Vicksburg from a water way. He also participated in the following battles: Chickasaw Bayou, December 29, 1862; Arkansas Post, Champion Hills, May 16, 1863; Black River, May 17, 1863; Haines Bluff, May 1, 1863; Vicksburg, May 19, 1863; Jackson, July 10, 1863, and Colliersville, October 11, 1863. In the charge of Vicksburg, over forty percent of the men in this battalion were lost. After the capture of that place his regiment was ordered after Gen. Johnson, and captured Jackson, Miss., July 10, 1863, then went into summer quarters at Big Black River. In September his regiment was ordered to Memphis, and he was taken sick there and sent to the hospital, and was there until February, 1864, when he rejoined his regiment at Huntsville, Ala., then was sent to Nashville, Tenn., and remained there until his discharge, October 3, 1864, when he returned home and again engaged in farming in Mondovi valley, where he has since remained. February 15, 1866, he married Mary Rafferty, who was born in Illinois in 1849, a daughter of Peter and Amelia (Towles) Rafferty. Peter was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, and Amelia died at the age of forty-eight years. Four children have been born to our subject: Charles H., February 4, 1867; Frank L., March 26, 1869; Ada A., March 14, 1871, and Olive M., September 3, 1879. Mr. Gates is a member of the G.A.R.    back to top
Giles, H.C.
Giles, Hurlburt, C. farmer, P.O. Mondovi, was born February 9, 1829, and is a son of Charles and Sophronia (Sparks) Ford. Charles B. was born in Lenox, Mass., August 28, 1791, and died September 5, 1877; he was by trade a shoemaker, but did farming most of his life. His father was also born in Massachusetts, and his ancestry as far as known were Americans. Mrs. Sophronia Ford was born in Lenox, Mass., April 12, 1803, and died March 20, 1869. She was the mother of twelve children, namely: Mary, born December 26, 1823; Charles and Jane, twins, December 27, 1824 (Charles died young, and Jane, March 5, 1845); Caroline, June 6, 1827, Charles, our subject; Almira, October 28, 1830; died November 30, 1853; John, February 22, 1833; George, December 27, 1834, died March 2, 1836; George, July 20, 1837; Marcus, November 22, 1839, died June 26, 1865; Jeanette, July 23, 1841; Margaret, April 25, 1845. At the age of twenty years our subject purchased the remainder of his time from his father, and went to Steuben county, N.Y., where he made the first start of his successful life in the lumber woods. In 1851 he came to Fon Du Lac county, Wis., and for two years rented farms, then purchased one, but in 1856 went to Dunn county, and purchased government land, and began to open up a farm. Not liking it there, he traded his claim for land near Mondovi, Buffalo county, on which he resided until 1868, when he moved onto the farm where he now resides, which consists of 160 acres, nearly all of which is under a high state of cultivation. February 5, 1852, Mr. Ford married Miss Elizabeth Plemmon, who was born May 28, 1832, in Jefferson county, N.Y., a daughter of Oliver and Amelia Plemmon. Her father was born in France and died at the age of thirty-six years; her mother was born in Canada, October 1, 1812, and died February 11, 1891. To Mr. and Mrs. Ford have been born eleven children, namely: Helen, December 25, 1853, died April 15, 1871; Isadore A., June 28, 1855, died January 30, 1856; Orlando B., April 15, 1859, died September 9, 1868; Charles H., April 161861; Oliver E., January 2, 1863; Oscar, March 26, 1865, died June 12, 1865; Edgar B., August 8, 1867; George P., March 23, 1869, died February 23, 1871; Ernest L., March 23, 1871; Arvilla, December 18, 1874, and John C., December 25, 1877. Mr. Ford is a republican in politics, and has been school director three terms, supervisor of his town for four terms, and alderman of the city of Mondovi two terms. His wife has been a Methodist for twenty years.    back to top
Gilkey, G.W.
Gilkey, George Warren, , farmer, P.O. Mondovi George Warren Gilkey was born in Somerset county, Me., October 9, 1827, a son of Edward and Mary (Pratt) Gilkey. Gilkey was born in 1802, in Bucksport, Me., was a farmer by occupation and died May 8, 1862. His father was of Scotch descent, was in the war of 1812, and died at Augusta, Me. Mrs. Mary Gilkey was born in 1809, and died early in life. George W., remained with his parents until he reached his majority. At eighteen years of age he taught school, working on the farm in the summer. In 1851 he went to California to engage in gold mining. After following mining and lumbering for five years with only fair success he returned to Maine, but after a short time came to Wisconsin. He taught school in Maine, California and Wisconsin. He worked on a farm, which he owned in Sheboygan county, in 1858. He then bought a farm ten miles out of Milwaukee, on the plank road, where he lived until 1860. He then came to Mondovi and purchases sixteen forties of wild land and began to improve the same. During the next two years he put under cultivation 150 acres. In February, 1864, he enlisted in the Thirty-sixth Wisconsin volunteer infantry, and was appointed fifth sergeant. He went to Madison, where his regiment was sworn into the Untied States service, and they were ordered to join the army of the Potomac, and were attached to the second corps and second brigade. He was at the battles of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and every engagement from the Wilderness to Ream’s Station, and was never in a hospital nor off duty. He was captured by the rebel forces at the battle of Ream’s Station and taken to Libby Prison, thence to Belle Isle. He remained a prisoner of war for forty-five days, when he was paroled and sent north. In July, 1864, he was promoted to orderly sergeant, and after his parole was sent south of Richmond. Since the war Mr. Gilkey has engaged in farming and teaching. He purchased the Alma “Journal,” a county paper, but sold this and interested himself with the Mondovi “Herald” for some time. Mr. Gilkey was married in July, 1850, to Miss Catherine Adkins, who was born in 1831, a daughter of Rev. Charles and Mary (Manter) Adkins, of English descent. Two children have blessed this union: George Edward, born January 9, 1851, and Catherine Mary, December 16, 1858. His first wife died in 1861, and in 1863 he married Miss Georgian Lockwood, of Ohio, who died in 1868. In 1874 he married his third wife, Miss Atie A. Richard, of Maine, daughter of Rev. Amos A. and Elizabeth (Witherell) Richards, of English descent. Mr. Gilkey has always been a republican, voting the first time for Gen. Fremont, and the last time for President Harrison. He has been chairman of the town two terms, and town clerk for two terms, and justice of the peace for sixteen years; was appointed enumerator in 1860 for the town and city of Mondovi.    back to top
Hardy, C.S.
Hardy, Chester S., farmer, P.O. Mondovi, Chester S. Hardy was born in Sardinia, Erie county, New York, June 20, 1824, and is a son of Ezekiel and Martha (Farley) Hardy. Ezekiel Hardy was born in Vermont, and died at the age of seventy-four years. He was a farmer by occupation. His wife was also born in Vermont and died at the advanced age of seventy-nine years. When Chester S. was seventeen years old he commenced selling goods on the road from a wagon and continued at this for two years, then worked on his father’s farm for the next four years. He then purchased fifty acres of wild land near his father’s house and cleared it an built a house, but afterward sold it and bought 100 acres in Cattaraugus county, where he remained for three years. In 1856 he came to Wisconsin and bought 40 acres of land in Big Creek valley, Buffalo county, but finding this place too small for him, he in 1864, homesteaded the farm on which he now resides. He has bought lands adjoining until he now has 190 acres, 115 of which are under good cultivation. He has built a good residence and out-buildings, and his farm is well stocked. September 25, 1846, Mr. Hardy married Miss Almira Holmes, who was born December 26, 1829, a daughter of Joshua and Lovinia (Wilcox) Holmes. Eight children have been born to this union, namely: Martha Almira, March 15, 1849; Emmet, May 24, 1854; Mary, April 4, 1852; Adelbert, January 22, 1856; James, October 13, 1865; Ida, September 24, 1867; Charles, August 21, 1869; Alta, May 12, 1875. Ida died January 24, 1889, and Martha Almira died August 27, 1876. Mr. Hardy has always been a republican, and has taken a great interest in the educational affairs of the town.    back to top
Hayes, W.R.
Hayes, William R. farmer, P.O. Mondovi William R. Hayes, Buffalo county, was born in Luzerne county, Pa., June 27, 1852, a son of John and Fanny (Nogle) Hayes. His grandfather, who was born in Ireland, was one of five brothers who came to Pennsylvania, where he died at age seventy years. John, his son, the father of our subject, was born in Luzerne county, Pa., September 16, 1816, and was a lumberman by occupation. He died in Eau Claire county, Wis., April 12, 1886. His wife was born in Gouldsboro, Luzerne county, November 6, 1822, and died April 4, 1885. Her father, Frederick Nogle, was born in Germany, immigrated to this country when quite young, and died at the age of sixty-five years. William R. remained with his father until twenty-three years of age. April 20, 1868 he started for Eau Claire county with his father. In 1872 he commenced to work on a farm and the next year he purchased 130 acres, on which he now resides. His farm is located in Drammen township, Eau Claire county, and 100 acres are under cultivation. It is provided with a good residence, barns and granary. Mr. Hayes is a republican in politics, and has served as school clerk. February 20, 1876, he married Isabelle Rowe, who was born July 30, 1855, a daughter of Henry and Lucinda Rowe. This union has been blessed with five children, namely: Edna, born November 18, 1878; Joseph Henry, November 18, 1880; Lucinda, November 16, 1883; John, May 14, 1887, and Sarah V., June 18, 1891.    back to top
Hebard, C.
Hebard, Dr. Charles , Physician & Surgeon, Mondovi, 1865 Charles Hebard, physician, Mondovi, was born in West Randolph, Vt., January 31, 1838. His ancestors came from England to this country in the early colonial times. Robert Hebard, a native England, immigrated to America in 1635 and settled in Massachusetts, where he died May 7, 1684. His son, born at Salem, Mass., in 1648, married Miss Mary Waller, and they had born to them seven children, one of whom, Robert Hebard, was born July 8, 1676 and died June 26, 1742, at Windham, Conn. Robert Hebard married Miss Mary Read, who bore him ten children, on of whom, Samuel, was born May 2, 1710. For his second wife Samuel married Miss Mary Burnap, and to them were born seven children, among whom were Diah and Milan, the form born June 29, 1757, at Windham, Conn., and died there, the latter born January 30,. 1762, and the grandfather of our subject. Milan married Miss Betsey Burham, in 1793, and in 1794 moved to Randolph, Vt. They were the parents of three daughters and two sons, among whom was Erastus, who was born July 21, 1800. Erastus married Nancy Carpenter, February 1, 1826, and this union was blessed with five children, namely: Susan, born 1828; Marshall, in 1830; Marcia, in 1835; Charles, January 31, 1838; and Mary, March 18, 1840. Charles Hebard attended the district school and Orange county grammar school, worked on the farm until 1859, when he commenced the study of medicine at Randolph, Vt. January 1, 1862, he enlisted as hospital steward in the Ninety-fourth regiment, New York volunteer infantry, and served until March 17, 1863, when he was discharged on account of the consolidation of his regiment with another. He was in the second army corps on the Potomac, was in the battles of Cedar Mountain, second Bull Run, Chantilly Height, Antietam and first Fredericksburg. After his discharge he entered Bellevue college of New York, from which he graduated March 1, 1865. Immediately after coming west, he located at Mondovi, where he has been in active practice up to the present time. Since 1873 he has been examining surgeon for pensions for the government. March 8, 1868, Mr. Hebard married Miss Eva Melinda, daughter of Ebenezer and Melinda (Orcutt) Ainsworth, who were of English descent, but born in Vermont. This union has been blessed with five children: Mary, born October 2, 1869; Estelle, November 4, 1874; Egbert Charles, September 27, 1876, died February 27, 1879; Susan, April 27, 1880, and Irma, July 17, 1883. Mr. Hebard is a member of the Knights of Pythias, A.O.U.W., and has been a Free Mason for thirty-one years. He has always been a republican in politics, and in his religious views is a Unitarian.    back to top
Hilliard, O.W.
Hilliard, O.W. , farmer, P.O. Mondovi O.W. Hilliard was born in Clinton county, N.Y., April 15, 1832, and is a son of Marinus and Betsy (Balch) Hilliard. Marenus Hilliard was born in Vermont in 1791, and was a volunteer in the war in 1812 and participated in the battle of Plattsburgh on Lake Champlain. He was a farmer by occupation and died ain April, 1855. His father was also born in America and served in the revolutionary war, in which he was taken prisoner. His grandfather was one of three brothers who immigrated to this country in the colonial times. Mrs. Betsy Hilliard was born in Massachusetts in 1798 and died in 1866. Her parents Ebenezer and Sarah (Berchard) Balch, were of Scotch extraction. O.W. Hilliard finished his education at the Beckwith Street academy at Schuyler Falls, N.Y. At the age of seventeen he began working in a flouring-mill in Essex county, N.Y., where he remained two years. He then worked on the lakes until the fall of 1852, when he returned home and entered the milling business again. In the spring of 1855 he came to Michigan and worked at milling. In the fall of 1856 he located in Green county, Wis., and worked on a farm three years. He then came to Mondovi and put in crops on shares. November 26, 1860, he took a claim of one-half section of railroad an government lands, on which he now resides, having 200 acres under cultivation, a good farm house, large and commodious barns and other outbuildings. August 15, 1862, he enlisted in company G, Twenty-fifth Wisconsin volunteer infantry. His first service was in Minneapolis, where with his regiment, he was sent to fight the Indians. He afterward took part in many battles, among which may be mentioned the siege of Vicksburg, Sherman’s raid across Mississippi to Meridian, Atlanta campaign and Jonesboro. He then marched back to East Point and went into camp. Mr. Hilliard was sent to the Marietta, Ga. Hospital, and afterward transferred to other hospitals. November 15, 1864, he was sent with a detachment to hold Dalton, Ga., which was the extreme outpost; remained thre until January 15, 1865, when he started for Annapolis, Md., then to Neb erne, N.C.; thence to Kingston, where he had three days’ battle; then joined Sherman at Goldborough, N.C.; March 25, 1865, marched through to Washington, was at the grand review, and mustered out June 7, 1865, at Washington, D.C. His regiment lost more men than any other regiment in the state. Politically he is a republican. October 18, 1865, Mr. Hilliard married Susan Elizabeth, born July 20, 1848, a daughter of Perry and Catherine Saxe. Her father was born November 23, 1816, and her mother February 24, 1819. Both are still living. The following children were born to our subject: Jefferson, born October 18, 1867; Bryon Ellsworth, September 28, 1868, died October 30, 1868; Charlotte Letitia, born August 18, 1870; Catherine Leona, born June 5, 1874; Edna, born May 11, 1876, died December 14, 1876; and Reuben Perry, born July 18, 1884.    back to top
Holmes, C.
Holmes, Carlos , farmer, P.O. Mondovi Carlos Joshua Holmes, was born January 5, 1834, in Java, Wyoming county, N.Y., a son of Joshua and Lavinia (Wilcox) Holmes. Joshua Holmes was born in Berlin, Rensselaer county, N.Y., while his father came to this country in colonial times, and was a surgeon in the war of 1776. Lavinia Holmes was born in Rhode Island, and her father was also of old Revolutionary stock, and died at about eighty years of age. Carlos J. was the fourth son born to his parents, and remained at home helping his father on the farm until nineteen years of age. He then came west to St. Paul, Minn., and worked in the pineries for seven years. In 1860 he went to Pike’s Peak to mine for gold, and crossed the Rocky mountains eight times in search of it. He had to go through the Sioux Indian country when they were up in arms, and had massacred about all the white people from New Ulm, Minn., north and west through their country, which made it a very perilous journey. He mined in Pike’s Peak, Mont., and the British possessions with fair success until 1865, when he returned with money sufficient to buy a farm, which he did in 1866, in the then town of Naples, now Mondovi, on which he now resides. He has a farm of 360 acres, with 300 under improvement, with an elegant farm residence, good barns, all kinds of machinery and stock. Mr. Holmes was untied in marriage with Miss Esther Sabin, who bore him one child, Carlos J. The latter was married May 13, 1891, to Miss May, daughter of James and Fanny Brownlee. Mr. Holmes is a republican in politics, and has been supervisor of his town for twelve years. He believes in the fundamental principles of religion, but is not a member of any church.    back to top
Houser, W.L.
Houser, Walter L. , editor and publisher, Mondovi, Wis., was born in Tidioute, Warren county, Pa., May 6, 1855. His father was James Houser and his mother Margaret Louisa Houser, nee Mayee. He came to Wisconsin with his mother ( his father having died in 1861) in 1865, and resided in Pierce and Pepin counties until 1875, when he located at Mondovi and commenced the publication of the Buffalo County “Herald,: of which he is owner and publisher. His opportunities in early life to obtain an education were limited, owing to the financial circumstances of his mother, who, only by almost superhuman efforts, succeeded in keeping her four children together and providing the necessaries of life for them. To her great self sacrifice and valuable counsel in early life, the subject of this sketch is mostly indebted for whatever success he has attained in life. Such an education as could be obtained in a backwoods district school, supplemented by a short course in an academy, is all the training in an educational way he had for life’s battle. In 1877 he married Miss Susie C., daughter of John and Paulina Le Gore, who were among the very earliest settlers of this town. Five children have been born to them: Mortimer Abner, born in 1878; Helen Estella, who died in 1880at the age of twenty-one months; Ethel Isabel, born in 1881; Vilas Walter, who died in 1886, at the age of two years; and Hazel, born in 1887.Mr. Houser has held local offices a good share of the time since his majority, and is at present municipal judge of the city and county supervisor for the first ward. He was clerk on the committee on enrolled bills of the state senate in 1879, and clerk of the committee on judiciary of the same body in 1880. He has been assistant chief clerk of the assembly for the last three sessions, the last under a democratic administration, though himself an ardent republican. He has always been active in politics, and was a member of the republican state conventions in 1888 and 1890. He is not a member of any church, but withholds no support from the cause of religion that his means and opportunities warrant him in giving.    
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Hubbard, G.
Hubbard, Gates a prominent farmer of the town of Mondovi, was born in Kirky, Vt., July 22, 1837, and was a son of Hubbard and Henrietta (Nickerson) Gates, the former of whom was born in 1803 and died in 1876, and was by occupation a farmer. His father, John Gates, the grandfather of our subject, died in 1854. The family came to the United States from England in the early colonial days. Henrietta, the mother of our subject, was born in Cape May, Mass., in 1806, and died in 1880. Her father, Joseph, was also born in Massachusetts, and was of English descent and died at the advanced age of seventy-three years. Hubbard Gates spent his early life on the home farm, going to school. He immigrated to Wisconsin in 1856, and engaged in farming until his enlistment, which occurred October 3, 1861, in Company B, First battalion, Thirteenth United States Infantry, and was attached to the fifteenth army corps. He was ordered to Jefferson Barracks, Mo., where he remained until February, 1862, when he was ordered to Alton, Ill. to guard prisoners of war until August 1, 1862, when he was sent to Louisville, Ky., then to Memphis, Tenn., to join Grant, and then to Vicksburg, and was in the first attack on Vicksburg, two days’ battle. He assisted in the capture of Arkansas Post January 11, 1863, after which he returned to Vicksburg, and worked on the canal projected by Grant to cut off Vicksburg from a water way. He also participated in the following battles: Chickasaw Bayou, December 29, 1862; Arkansas Post, Champion Hills, May 16, 1863; Black River, May 17, 1863; Haines Bluff, May 1, 1863; Vicksburg, May 19, 1863; Jackson, July 10, 1863, and Colliersville, October 11, 1863. In the charge of Vicksburg, over forty percent of the men in this battalion were lost. After the capture of that place his regiment was ordered after Gen. Johnson, and captured Jackson, Miss., July 10, 1863, then went into summer quarters at Big Black River. In September his regiment was ordered to Memphis, and he was taken sick there and sent to the hospital, and was there until February, 1864, when he rejoined his regiment at Huntsville, Ala., then was sent to Nashville, Tenn., and remained there until his discharge, October 3, 1864, when he returned home and again engaged in farming in Mondovi valley, where he has since remained. February 15, 1866, he married Mary Rafferty, who was born in Illinois in 1849, a daughter of Peter and Amelia (Towles) Rafferty. Peter was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, May 5, 1864, and Amelia died at the age of forty-eight years. Four children have been born to our subject: Charles H., February 4, 1867; Frank L., March 26, 1869; Ada A., March 14, 1871, and Olive M., September 3, 1879. Mr. Gates is a member of the G.A.R.    
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Hurtley, Thomas
Hurtley, Thomas ,farmer. P.O. Mondovi Thomas Hurtley was born near Toronto, Canada, January 22, 1837, a son of William and Isabel (O’Hearn) Hurtley. His father was born in England in 1802, immigrated to Canada at an early day, and in 1867 came to the United States, and died at the age of eighty-nine years; His mother was born in Nova Scotia, of Irish descent, and died early in life. Our subject came to the United States with his uncle, Thomas O’Hearn, who reared him. They located at Lewiston, Niagara county, N.Y., where they lived until. He was fourteen years old, and then moved to Dodge county, Wis. He attended school winters and worked on the farm summers until he reached the age of twenty. In the spring of 1855, he came to the Buffalo river valley, now Naples township, and was one of the first to make a wagon track through this valley. He worked for others at first, but finally preempted eighty acres of land, and with the exception of the time he was in the war has been farming in the valley ever since. He now owns a beautiful farm of 155 acres, with 100 acres under cultivation. The farm is well stocked and in 1890 he built a commodious farm residence. Mr. Hurtley enlisted September 23, 1864, in Company A, Twenty-fifth Wisconsin volunteers, and immediately went south and joined the regiment at Marietta. He was with Sherman on his march to the sea, and took part in all the engagements of his regiment on this campaign, and was present at the review at Washington, D.C. He was married in 1857, to Jane Root, who was born in 1835, a daughter of Chauncey and Saloma Calkings, both of American birth. This union has been blessed with seven children, six sons and one daughter. Three of their children still remain at home. Mr. Hurtley is a republican and holds liberal views on religion.    
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Jackson, E.
Jackson, Elijah ,farmer, P.O. Mondovi, Buffalo county Elijah Jackson was born in Madison county, N.Y., January 9, 1824, and is the son of John and Silinda (Briggs) Jackson. His father was born in 1798 in Connecticut, and died at the age of seventy-seven years. His mother was born in 1800, on the battleground of Plattsburg, and died in 1840. The house in which his mother was born had a cannon ball shot through it, and the ball was kept by the family for many years. Daniel Briggs, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was born in Dutchess county, N.Y., in 1758, and died at the age of ninety years. He was in the Revolutionary war and was in the battle of Plattsburg, where he was surrounded by the British at his old home, but by the help of the ladies of the house escaped. His ancestors were here in colonial times. At the early age of nineteen years, Elijah Jackson bought a piece of land and commenced farming for himself, but sold out, and in 1855 came west and located at La Crosse, securing a clerkship in the New England hotel. In 1856 he served as deputy marshal of that place, and was one of the first officers under the city charter. He afterward mobbed to Onalaska and ran a hotel and farm for a short time, then bought a piece of land in Holland township and remained upon it until 1873, when he sold out and moved to Drammen township, Eau Claire county, and bought the farm upon which he now resides. He has 115 acres under cultivation with a good residence and out-buildings, and has the farm well-stocked. Mr. Jackson married, in 1843, Percis Chatman, and they have one child, Levant, born November 17, 1845. Mrs. Jackson died November 1, 1859, and Mr. Jackson married Almina Elizabeth, a daughter of John and Phoebe Sadlemire, born March 31, 1839. John Sadlemire was born in 1808 and his wife in 1818. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have six children, namely: La Sira Malissa, born March 16, 1861; John M., December 16, 1862 died March 26, 1863; Morris Edward, March 4, 1864; Rodney Barney, June 23, 1866; Daniel Briggs, November 12, 1869, died January 1, 1871; and Mary Amanda, November 24, 1873. Mr. Jackson is conservative in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.    
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Johnson, J.H.
Johnson, J.H. ,farmer, P.O. Mondovi, John H. Johnson was born December 6, 1856, in Norway, a son of Herman and Betsy Johnson, the former of whom was born in Norway, and died aged fifty-six years; the latter was also born in Norway, and is still living at the age of seventy years. John H. immigrated to this country with his parents when a small child. They located in Dane county, Wis., in 1860, and the father purchased a farm, on which he resided until 1862, when he sold, and purchased a farm in Iowa county. Six years later he sold out and came to Mondovi township Buffalo county, and purchased the farm on which our subject now resides, and which consists of 160 acres, 100 acres of which are under a high state of cultivation. John H. assisted his father in opening up the farm, and after the latter’s death carried it on for his mother, and later bought out the other heirs, and now owns the whole of it. April 4, 1884, he married Miss Annie Swiggum, and they have three children: Bessie, born January 29, 1885; Ella, November 5, 1887, and Melville, May 5, 1888. He is a republican in politics, and has served as assessor for three years. School clerk for six years, and constable for six terms. He is a member of the Lutheran Church.    
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Kellom, G.W.
Kellom, G.W. ,farmer P.O. Mondovi George W. Kellom was born in Concord township, Chautauqua county, N.Y., February 3, 1831, the eldest son of Josiah and Amy (Walters) Kellom. Josiah Kellom was born in Erie county, N.Y., in 1811, and was a farmer by occupation; his wife was a native of the same place, born in 1811 and died at the age of eighty-one years. Josiah’s father, who lived in New Hampshire, was of English descent, and served int the war of 1812, and died at the age of seventy-two years. The maternal grandparents of our subject were of English descent; his grandfather died early in life, and his grandmother lived to the age of eighty years. George W. remained with his parents until he reached his majority. In 1861 he came west and located in Mondovi township, Buffalo county, worked for others a while, then homesteaded eighty acres, which he still owns, since adding to it, until he now has 150 acres, with 120 under cultivation, with residences and buildings which cost him $3,000. In 1858 Mr. Kellom married Miss Susan M. Aldrich, and one child was born to them, March 6, 1859. Mrs. Kellom died March 25, 1859 and October 1, 1862, Mr. Kellom married Miss Annetta, daughter of Hiram and Naomi Barrows, born January 26, 1841. (See sketch of H.C. Barrows) Four children have been born to them, as follows: Fred Nelson, October 29, 1863; Fred Aldrich, June 8, 1868; Mamie, September 27, 1882, and Edgar Delos, August 9, 1871. They also have an adopted daughter who was born December 15, 1874. Mr. Kellom is a republican in his political views, and cast his first vote for General Scott, while his last vote was for Gen. Harrison. He and his wife are members of the Baptist Church.    
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Knapp, W.M.
Knapp, W.M. ,farmer, P.O. Mondovi William M. Knapp was born near Scranton, Pa., January 12, 1854, and is the son of Hiram and Sarah Ann (Biesecker) Knapp. Hiram Knapp was born in 1809, in Pennsylvania, and was a farmer by occupation. His wife was born in 1818, in the same state, and died January 8, 1881. William M. came to Wisconsin with his parents at the age of six years, and settled in Naples township, Buffalo county, where he attended the district schools in winter and worked on the farm in the summer until fifteen years of age. He sold the home farm in 1886, and is living on section eighteen, town twenty-four, range ten west, in Naples township. June 27, 1882, he married Miss Luna Rosina Goddard, who was born in Modena, Buffalo county, Wis., September 12, 1866, and is a daughter of Roswell Philip and Rosina (Thomas) Goddard. Mr. Goddard was born in Canada, and came to this country in 1860, and settled on a farm in Modena, Buffalo county, Wis., where he lived until 1877, when he built a store building in Eleva, Wis., and engaged in mercantile business. He continued in this until about 1890, since when, and also before selling out his mercantile business, he has dealt quite extensively in farm machinery. He is still living, at the age of fifty-five years. His wife was born in Canada, and is now fifty-one years of age. Mr. Knapp and wife have on son, born November 12, 1878, named Roy Elton, who shows unusual aptitude for learning. Mr. Knapp is a stanch democrat, as was his father. He is not a member of any church, but attends the Methodist.    
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Lockwood, B.S.
Lockwood, Bradley Smith ,Stockman, and Mayor of City, Mondovi, 1876 Bradley Smith Lockwood was born in Hannibal, Oswego county, N.Y., August 21, 1856, and is a son of Leander and Lavina (Blodget) Lockwood. The father was born in Vermont in 1811, and is still living, a farmer by occupation, while his grandfather was also born in Vermont, and died at sixty-two years of age. Mrs. Lavina Lockwood was born in New Hampshire in 1810, and died December 19, 1880. Her father was of German descent and lived to be very old. Bradley S. Lockwood came west at the age of seventeen years and settled in Mondovi, Wis., where he engaged in the pump business, which he still continues. In the fall of 1882 he became associated with Frank Morse, in a grocery store here, but in the following spring sold out and went into the hardware business in company with Canar Bros. He remained with them about six months, then sold out to his partners. He next began to buy and sell horses, which he shipped to Pipe Stone county, Minn. In 1888 he built a cold storage refrigerator building, for the handling of eggs, butter and all kinds of fresh meats, which has proved very successful. At present, he is also buying and shipping stock. February 14, 1874, Mr. Lockwood married Miss Elma Ida Nelson, who was born in Lake Mills, Wis., December 30, 1857 and is a daughter of Samuel and Electa Nelson. Samuel Nelson was born in Washington county, N. Y., February 5, 1820, and was a farmer by occupation. He enlisted in Company K, Thirty-sixth Wisconsin volunteer infantry, and went through the war with his regiment until the fall of 1864, when he was taken prisoner in the battle of the Wilderness, and was sent to Belle Isle. He was transferred to Salisbury prison where he died January 1, 1865, from starvation and exposure, and his remains are still in a prisoner’s grave. His father was born in Ireland, both parents being of Scotch extraction. They immigrated to this country when he was about six years old. Mrs. Lockwood’s mother was born in Hartford, Washington county, N.Y., July 15, 1819, and is a daughter of Wanton and Marcy (Hill) Bump. She resides with her daughter. Wanton Bump was born in 1769 and died in 1832. The grandfather Hill was in the Revolutionary war. Two children have been born to Mr. Lockwood and wife, Charles William, born September 10, died September 24, 1876, and Cleo Alta, born April 17, 1878. Mr. Lockwood’s success in his various ventures has been gratifying and he has accumulated property to quite an amount, and is on the road to prosperity. At the time Mondovi was organized and received its charter as a city, he was elected Mayor and has held that office to date, being in his third term of office. He also held the position of deputy sheriff and is a stanch democrat, and believes in right and justice.    
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Merritt, Loren A.
Merritt, Loren A. ,Farming & Teaching, S.21, T. Naples, P.O. Mondovi, 1861 Loren A. Merritt, farmer, P.O. Mondovi. was born in Ashtabula, Ohio, January 19, 1847, and is a son of Marshall and Rachel (Mapes) Merritt. Marshall Merritt was born in Canada, December 28, 1811, and in September, 1813, was taken to Ohio and in 1828 moved to Ashtabula, that state, where he resided until 1852, when he went to Allamakee county, Iowa. In 1861 he came to Naples township, Buffalo county, Wis., where he died in 1890. His father was born in New York in 1771, moved to Canada in 1808, and was there at the commencement of the war of 1812. As he was an American citizen he was captured by seven British soldiers, but on the march to prison he escaped to our lines, and during the rest of the war held a position as scout for our forces. All his property, however, was confiscated. He died in 1827 in Michigan. His father was one of five brothers who were born in New York of Norman French extraction, whose father came to America in early colonial times. Mrs. Rachel Merritt, our subject’s mother, was born in 1819, in Wayne, Ohio, a daughter of Henry and Rebecca (Angelo) Mapes. Henry Maps was born in England and came to America as a British soldier in the war of 1812; he remained here and died in 1824; his wife was born in 1801, of German descent, and died at the age of seventy-two years. Loren A. Merritt had but little opportunity for an education in early yo9uth. At the age of nineteen years he began to educate himself as best he could with his means. He finally graduated at Galesville University as a bachelor of science, in 1872, and has taught twenty-five terms of school. Twenty years ago he bought eighty acres of wild land, and later added 170 acres, and now has under cultivation 200 acres. He has also built a fine residence, in which he now resides. March 5, 1876, Mr. Merritt married Miss Lila L. Goddard, who was born December 28, 1859, a daughter of Roswell Philip and Rosanna (Thomas) Goddard. Five Children have been born to this union, namely: Sadie Lillian, November 24, 1877; Loren A., December 11, 1880; Roswell Philip, March 26, 1882; Rachel Rosanna, May 27, 1887, and Henry, December 5, 1890. Mr. Merritt is a republican in politics, has been school director for three terms, town clerk for six terms, justice of the peace four terms, health officer five years and chairman of the town two terms. He believes in the principles of the Baptist church, but is not a member.    
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